1105 East Jackson Boulevard, Suite 3
Jonesborough, TN 37659

(423)-753-2192 ext. 3

 

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Washington County Soil Conservation

Soil Conservation Education

The Washington County Soil Conservation District is dedicated to soil conservation education and outreach in the community.  With the help of Sammy Soil and Ruby Raindrop, the soil conservation district educates students about what it means to be a conservation farmer and take care of the soil. Visits from Sammy Soil and Ruby Raindrop can be scheduled through the conservation district office. 

The Enviroscape model is a great tool the Soil Conservation District is able to utilize in educating students about pollution and our watershed.  This interactive model shows students how important it is to keep our water clean. 

 

Helping Our Landowners

The soil conservation district along with our Natural Resources Conservation Service partners are happy to assist landowners with any questions they have regarding agricultural land in Washington County.  From technical assistance to cost share programs, we have you covered.  Please feel free to browse our information about programs in the menu above and call us if you have any questions. 

 

Soil Conservation Youth Board

Are you between the ages of 14 and 21, interested in community service, and have a passion for conservation in your community?  Come join our Washington County Soil Conservation Youth Board!!! This group of young people have committed themselves to community service and conservation in Washington County and have a great time while doing so.  See our "About Us" tab above for more information. 

 

 

FAQs

What is Soil Health?

The continued capacity of soil to function as a vital living ecosystem that sustains and improves the living condition of plants, animals and humans.

Can I pull gravel out of my creek?

You may be able to pull gravel from a creek, but only within guidelines of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). For more guidance call the TDEC office in Columbia at 931-490-3941 or visit their website: www.tennessee.gov/environment/permits/arapgps

In what situations do I need a permit?

Most work on streams, stream banks, waterways, or drainage areas should be reviewed by TDEC. If you have questions concerning permits you should contact the TDEC office in Columbia at 931-490-3941, or visit their website: www.tennessee.gov/environment/permits/arapgps

Who do I call for a burn permit?

The agency to call for a burn permit is the Tennessee Department of Agriculture “Division of Forestry”, their number is 1-877-350-(BURN) 2876 or online: www.BurnSafeTN.org. Burn permits are required from October 15 thru May 15 and at other times during certain weather conditions.

Where do I find soils information and aerial imagery for my farm?

The USDA-NRCS website provides aerial photography & soils information. http://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov.

Where can I find floodplain maps for my property?

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has a great deal of flood information on their website. We have the ability in our office to generate maps for landowners with aerial imagery that has a flood plain map overlaid. Contact us to get a map of your property.

Who do I call when trying to locate underground utility lines (gas, phone, cable, electric, etc.)?

Before you DIG call “Tennessee One Call” at 811 or go to their website: www.tnonecall.com. A person can be held liable for damages incurred if they dig and do not call Tennessee One Call.

Other Questions?

Please call our office at 931-363-2675 x3

end faq

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination against its customers, employees, and applicants for employment on the bases of race, color, national origin, age, disability, sex, gender identity, religion, reprisal, and where applicable, political beliefs, marital status, familial or parental status, sexual orientation, or all or part of an individual's income is derived from any public assistance program, or protected genetic information in employment or in any program or activity conducted or funded by the Department. (Not all prohibited bases will apply to all programs and/or employment activities.)

Giles County Soil Conservation District is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer.

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Today, Nonpoint Source Pollution (NPS) is the nation's largest source of water quality problems. It is the main reason that about 40 percent of our surveyed rivers, lakes, and estuaries are not clean enough to meet basic uses such as fishing or swimming. NPS pollution occurs when water runs over land or through the ground, picking up pollutants, and depositing them into rivers, lakes, and coastal waters or introducing them into ground water. NPS pollution is widespread because it can occur any time activities disturb the land or water. Agriculture, forestry, grazing, septic systems, recreational boating, urban runoff, construction, physical changes to stream channels, and habitat degradation are potential sources of NPS pollution. Careless or uninformed household management also contributes to NPS pollution.

To address this diffuse type of pollution, Congress established the Nonpoint Source Program, funded by the US-EPA through Section 319 of the Clean Water Act. The Tennessee Department of Agriculture administers the Nonpoint Source Program in Tennessee on behalf of US-EPA. This program, created in 1987, provides funds to states, territories and Indian tribes for installing Best Management Practices (BMPs) to stop NPS pollution; providing training, education, and demonstrations; and monitoring water quality.

The TDA-NPS Program is non-regulatory, promoting voluntary, incentive-based solutions. It is a cost-share program, paying for 60% of the cost of a project. It is up to the grantee to come up with the remaining 40%, usually in cash and “in-kind” services. It primarily funds three types of programs:

  • BMP Implementation Projects improve an impaired waterbody, or prevent a non-impaired water from becoming placed on the 303(d) List. Projects of this type receive highest priority for funding. All projects involving BMPs must be based on an approved “Watershed Based Plan”. Small projects can be funded to write these plans.
  • Monitoring Projects. Up to 20% of the available grant funds assist water quality monitoring efforts in Tennessee streams, both in the state's 5-year watershed monitoring program, and also in performing before-and-after BMP installation, so that water quality improvements can be verified.
  • Educational Projects funded through TDA-NPS raise public awareness of practical steps that can be taken to eliminate NPS pollution.

Eligible applicants include non-profit organizations, local governments, state agencies, soil conservation districts, and universities.

Contact: Responsible Staff @ xxx-xxx-xxxx x3

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The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination against its customers, employees, and applicants for employment on the bases of race, color, national origin, age, disability, sex, gender identity, religion, reprisal, and where applicable, political beliefs, marital status, familial or parental status, sexual orientation, or all or part of an individual's income is derived from any public assistance program, or protected genetic information in employment or in any program or activity conducted or funded by the Department. (Not all prohibited bases will apply to all programs and/or employment activities.)

Giles County Soil Conservation District is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer.

Upcoming Events

Tue Jun 12 @ 6:00PM -
June Board Meeting/Picnic